In the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic, the Eid al-Adha Festival celebrated worldwide

Across the planet, millions of Muslims are celebrating the first part of Eid al-Adha on Friday, amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

From Friday to August 3, Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of Sacrifice, in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic.

In Saudi Arabia, pilgrims on Friday began the ritual of stoning Satan, one of the last of the great pilgrimage, which has been drastically reduced this year to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. During the scorching heat, the pilgrims arrived at Mina, carefully monitored by guides and police who ensured that the rules on physical distancing were followed. This year, the authorities provided sterilized stones to the pilgrims. Previously, they were picked up from the ground.

Muslim pilgrims symbolically throw stones at a stone wall, the last ritual of the annual hajj and the first day of Eid al-Adha, while maintaining social distances to protect against coronavirus in Mina near the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Friday 31 July 2020. AP
Men also observe the last annual hajj ritual and prepare to throw stones at a stone wall and on the second day of Eid al-Adha, in Mina, near the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, on Friday 31 July 2020. The global coronavirus pandemic has cast a shadow over all aspects of this year's pilgrimage, which last year drew 2.5 million Muslims from around the world to Mount Arafat, where the Prophet Muhammad served, delivered his final sermon nearly 1,400 years ago. Only a very limited number of pilgrims have been allowed to participate in the hajj among several restrictions aimed at limiting the potential spread of coronavirus.
Men also observe the last annual hajj ritual and prepare to throw stones at a stone wall and on the second day of Eid al-Adha, in Mina, near the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, on Friday 31 July 2020. The global coronavirus pandemic has cast a shadow over all aspects of this year’s pilgrimage, which last year drew 2.5 million Muslims from around the world to Mount Arafat, where the Prophet Muhammad took, delivered his final sermon nearly 1,400 years ago. Only a very limited number of pilgrims have been allowed to participate in the hajj among several restrictions aimed at limiting the potential spread of coronavirus. AP – Ministry of Media
As mosques are limited to ten people after government measures to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Muslim worshipers recite Eid al-Adha prayers in a park in the mixed Arab Jewish city of Jaffa, near Tel Aviv, Israel, on Friday, July 31, 2020.
As mosques are limited to ten after government measures to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Muslim worshipers recite Eid al-Adha prayers in a park in the mixed Arab Jewish city of Jaffa, near Tel Aviv, Israel, on Friday, July 31, 2020. AP – Oded Balilty
Worshipers perform Eid al-Adha prayers while maintaining social distance at the Gazi Husrev begging mosque in Sarajevo, Bosnia on Friday, July 31, 2020.
Worshipers perform Eid al-Adha prayers while maintaining social distance at the Gazi Husrev begging mosque in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on Friday, July 31, 2020. © AP – Kemal Softi
Social distances are also respected by church artists in Moscow, Russia on July 31, 2020.
Social distances are also respected by church artists in Moscow, Russia on July 31, 2020. © Shamil Zhumatov, Reuters
Aerial view of Indonesian Muslims praying at the Grand Mosque in Al-Azhar, Jakarta, Indonesia, while respecting their distance, July 31, 2020.
Aerial view of Indonesian Muslims praying at the Grand Mosque in Al-Azhar, Jakarta, Indonesia, while respecting their distance, July 31, 2020. via REUTERS – ANTARA PHOTO
Another aerial photo of Thai Muslims praying for Eid al-Adha at Thai Islamic Center in Bangkok, Thailand, July 31, 2020.
Another aerial photo of Thai Muslims praying for Eid al-Adha at Thai Islamic Center in Bangkok, Thailand, July 31, 2020. REUTERS – ATHIT PERAWONGMETHA
Muslim worshipers buy goats at a cattle market during the celebration to mark the Muslim holiday to Eid al-Adha in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic in Nairobi, Kenya, July 31, 2020.
Muslim worshipers buy goats at a cattle market during the celebration to mark the Muslim holiday to Eid al-Adha in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic in Nairobi, Kenya, July 31, 2020. © Thomas Mukoya, Reuters
Men slaughter sheep on the first day of Eid al-Adha in Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, July 31, 2020. During Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of Sacrifice, it is common for Muslims to slaughter sheep or cattle and distribute portions of meat to the poor.
Men slaughter sheep on the first day of Eid al-Adha in Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, July 31, 2020. During Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of Sacrifice, it is common for Muslims to slaughter sheep or cattle and distribute portions of meat to the poor. © AP – Rahmat Gul